Abstracts on very small embryonic-like stem cells presented in ASH annual meeting NeoStem.

Dr. Robin Smith, M.D., MBA, NeoStem’s CEO, said, This week the National Institutes of Wellness approved the first 13 human embryonic stem cell lines for use in NIH-funded research so we are thrilled to talk about the news that there are actually adult stem cells that talk about many of the morphological features of embryonic stem cells, removing risk of severe graft versus sponsor disease or tissue rejection that can occur when the source of cells used for regenerative purposes is from a donor apart from the patient receiving the stem cells. We are very proud that the significance of our really small embryonic-like stem cell research has been acknowledged by the prestigious American Society of Hematology. This is an important endorsement of the scientific developments that NeoStem can be sponsoring in the field of adult stem cell analysis.

Local pharmacies can provide several inexpensive over-the-counter choices, he says.. A circadian rhythm gene discovered A few rare individuals who consistently nod off early, much before dawn then awaken wide-eyed, may blame a newly-found mutant gene because of their sleep troubles, Today Howard Hughes Medical Institute researchers announced. Ptacek, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute researcher, and Ying-Hui Fu, at the University of California, SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA. Their report shows up in the March 31, 2005, problem of the journal Nature. It’s not yet clear how the mutant gene functions to shift people’s rest period, their circadian rhythm, he added. But follow-on experiments in fruit flies and mice yielded results that are intriguing. When the mutant gene was inserted into the flies, for instance, it did the contrary of what was observed in the human family members: it lengthened circadian rhythm.Local pharmacies can provide several inexpensive over-the-counter choices, he says.. A circadian rhythm gene discovered A few rare individuals who consistently nod off early, much before dawn then awaken wide-eyed, may blame a newly-found mutant gene because of their sleep troubles, Today Howard Hughes Medical Institute researchers announced. Ptacek, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute researcher, and Ying-Hui Fu, at the University of California, SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA. Their report shows up in the March 31, 2005, problem of the journal Nature. It’s not yet clear how the mutant gene functions to shift people’s rest period, their circadian rhythm, he added. But follow-on experiments in fruit flies and mice yielded results that are intriguing. When the mutant gene was inserted into the flies, for instance, it did the contrary of what was observed in the human family members: it lengthened circadian rhythm.